Nothing Gold Can Stay

Robert Frost

Nature’s first green is gold,
Her hardest hue to hold.
Her early leaf’s a flower;
But only so an hour.
Then leaf subsides to leaf.
So Eden sank to grief,
So dawn goes down to day.
Nothing gold can stay.
 
This sequence is based on two—sometimes interacting—zinc plates.  One is etched in Nitric Acid, the leaves. The other, which is actually  a celery seedhead from the garden, was etched electrolytically, in Copper Sulphate. The problem with that etch is it is far too deep.
Why?  What went wrong? I started it, went off and made a quick phone call, forgot the time and when some 50 minutes later returned to the process realised it was totally overdone.
Sometimes, however,  using an "over-bitten" plate for its relief surface can work. In this case definitely it did not; yet the experiment was worthwhile.
I know which image will go into the video, for the line "Then leaf subsides to leaf".  Anyone who  wants comment is welcome.

Typography with letterpress

Some of the images are cropped and some show the actual etching on the page.  It's these images where the type will be placed. This doesn't matter for the video but it's critical for the etchings and the production of the artist books. I'm hoping to make 10 in time for the Printopia exhibition, 5 November.
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