02 Scripture

by Micro-moocs
Tags: bible, bible knowledge, leadership+, scripture

A Leadership+ micro-mooc on group preparation for bible study

Tips on Studying Scripture

Forum topic

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From the video we learnt that Howard Gardner identified multiple intelligences:

  • Verbal-linguistic
  • Logical-mathematical
  • Visual-spatial
  • Musical 
  • Nature- Naturalistic
  • Bodily-kinesthetic
  • Interpersonal
  • Intrapersonal

Choose a specific passage from the bible and consider how you would apply this knowledge to the passage. 

Describe in about 70 words the significance of Bible study in your ministry context.

When done, add a comment on this page about the video and other resourcing.

Leadership+

01 Koinonia

01 Koinonia

02 Scripture

03 Sharing Knowledge

03 Sharing Knowledge

04 Creativity

04 Creativity

05 Faith

05 Faith

06 Evangelism

06 Evangelism

07 Inclusivity

07 Inclusivity

08 Leading into the New

08 Leading into the New

09 Art and craft of Leadership

09 Art and craft of Leadership

10 Service

10 Service

11 Vision

11 Vision

12 Worship

12 Worship

13 Index and open badge award for successful completion of leadership+

13 Index and open badge award for successful completion of leadership+

Comments

Rosalie
10 March 2016, 11:17 PM

I've run many study groups on 'Bible Women' in churchy groups and also in the secular situation of U3A - apart from including a prayer in a church group the format is the same with both. I may give some input and supply a take home sheets with brief details but the major part involves the participants reading a short passage in groups of 2-3 and creating their own picture of this woman, age appearance, status and why she did what she did, then introducing their character to the main group. I think this is the sort of thing you are talking about!

David Bell
11 March 2016, 12:19 AM

Yes, exactly. Thanks Rosalie.

David Bell
21 September 2016, 6:56 AM
Now that will keep you both busy Dorothy.  There are some extra hard copy resources for those who want them. Let me know number required and Trinity-at-Waiake relearning will courier them down. The videos are short and the ideas is your group drives it forward any direction you want keeping it short and relevant to your context. Good luck1
Max Thomson
25 September 2016, 5:36 PM

 The question was asked about the study of Revelation. Rev Cedric Hay has offered the following book references:

- The Revelation of St John the Divine (G B Caird - the best commentary in the context of the time it was written - 300pp)

- Revelation of John (William Barclay - Devotional - 2 volumes)

- As Seeing the Invisible (D T Niles - Inspirational studies - 185pp)

David Bell
25 September 2016, 6:44 PM
The problem with this approach to Revelation I.e. studying a set text, is that nothing much gets learnt. I recommend different routes. Consider using dictionary of theology and trying to define what the word Revelation means. Then how it might be experienced. And finally how the experience might be transmitted to others. That's a full three  nights study group material.
Max Thomson
25 September 2016, 7:49 PM

Sorry - my post related to the book of Revelation - not the word "Revelation". Did we misunderstand Dorothy's question?  We enjoyed getting a brief insight into the symbolism in the book that was written at a time when early Christians were being persecuted.  David's suggestion of having a more theological approach would also be helpful.

 
Stuart Manins
25 September 2016, 7:56 PM

Rosalie, you responded to some questions I posted after attending a couple of sessions of Bible study on Revelation at our church recently. I replied to your email with a personal email because I hesitated to declare publically that I was unable to get much of benefit from the discussions we had and so I recommended that you contact other members of the group who had said that they found it useful. I gather that you have done this because I see that a number of commentaries have been recommended to you. But now I have been asked to make some public reply.

My problem is that unless I am satisfied with the approach to such study, then any ensuing discussion can result in the sharing of uninformed, unjustified, or even piously vague but well-intended deliberation rather than helpful study. A declared approach to how particular Scriptures need to be interpreted, i.e. the requirements of satisfactory exegesis and hermeneutics, along with the relevance of contemporary experience all need to be sorted out first. I don't expect agreement from all present but I do expect a desire in  the group to understand different valid and invalid approaches and the ability to articulate and control what ensues. Otherwise, we are at the mercy of uninformed or bigoted minds.

Bible study can be extremely rewarding if done well but at the same time distressingly pointless if mismanaged. I think the church needs to examine more closely what it accepts as a suitable bible study.

Rosalie
25 September 2016, 10:06 PM

Hi Stuart,

I'm sorry but I have lost the thread of the conversation - I've never received a person email from you. I would welcome a dialogue but  don't have your email. I don't know what you are referring to. My email is <sugrue.rm@clear.net.nz>  

David Bell
26 September 2016, 12:02 AM
I think Stuart's comment meant to refer to Dorothy. Meantime I was indicating Max,  there is a precursor to meaningful Bible study and that is what the unit is based on.
Stuart Manins
26 September 2016, 8:11 AM

Sorry Rosalie, how confusing for you;my sincere apologies! To help sort out the misunderstanding here is a copy of what I originally posted. 

Thanks David for reminding me that it was Dorothy who replied to me.

'Revelation comments from Stuart.

Chapter 1

In the Good News Bible, in verse 1, these ideas are claimed as truth from God:

  1. ‘Revelation’ is a record of what Jesus Christ revealed
  2. God gave it to him.
  3. Events recorded must happen very soon
  4. Christ informed John through an angel
  5. If I obey the messages I’ll be happy.

Comment: Why should I believe or not believe any of this? It may or may not be true. There are lots of Biblical claims that I do believe and others I don’t believe; both literally and metaphorically. How can I know? Do I have to believe in Angels? Certainly some ‘prophesied’ events don’t seem to have happened over the past 2000 years. What I can know, is that this is fairly certainly the introduction to John’s fantasy dream. But who’s the author? It’s in the third person, so unlikely to be John himself. If this is so, who is writing as Narrator? Does it matter? Yes! Someone needs to be responsible for the ideas outlined in points 1-5. I am interested to know the grounds on which they are made.

  1. John either dreams he is writing to 7 Asian churches or does send them letters.
  2. John states church beliefs of: Jesus’ resurrection, kingship over world rulers,

forgiveness of sins, priesthood of believers, second coming, final glorification.

Comment: From verse 4 on, John himself assumes authorship. Is there any evidence that the letters were actually sent and received by the 7 churches? Any evidence that they were responded to? The creed-like statements are what could have been expected, given the time is 81 – 96 AD (Emperor Domitian). How did John know about these churches and their particular details? Had he been perhaps an early Bishop in this fairly localized area? Can the imagined, described state of the Christian communities be verified? Did writing this ‘Revelation’ and sending it out to the 7 churches do any good, either in the dream or in reality? In what ways does Christ have ‘kingship over world leaders’?

  1. John in his trance imagined that the risen Jesus was talking to him declaring his

Authority over death and the world of the dead, and is now alive for ‘ever and ever’.

  1. He says that God loves us, and by Christ’s death has freed us from our sins.
  2. He sees Jesus Christ coming on clouds to be seen by everyone and have ‘All peoples on earth mourn over him’.

Comment: My Good News Bible states in the margin that: “It was thought that the dead continued to exist in a dark world under the ground”. To what extent do all the statements in Revelation need to be understood against the ancient ideas of a three-layered universe? If going to heaven when they die is an expectation for Christians, then are they expected to find their heaven in this ‘dark underground world? Is this heaven, of which the revelation is seen as a description, necessarily placed after this life, or can it be as Jesus once implied ‘within you’ now?

  1. John again claims his authorship of the ‘revelation’ with its message to 7 churches: Ephesus, Smyrna, Pergamum, Thyatira, Sardis, Philadelphia, Laodicea.
  2. He claims to be instructed to write the 7 letters and implies that their contents are dictated by Jesus Christ.

Comment: The claim that Christ has conquered death takes my attention. It’s a bit like the claim that Christ the King rules all the kingdoms of this world. I look around me and I see death very much still happening. Maybe the fear of death can be conquered.

All the time, I need to ask, who is saying what, why, on what grounds, and to whom?

Finally, the challenge is to me personally: What can I learn that would improve me?'

13 comments